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History of the Hotel

The Imperial Hotel in Cork City is one of Cork’s most exclusive properties. The historic architecture of this 4 star hotel Cork merges with contemporary design to create a magical environment. The Imperial Hotel, has been serving Cork city since 1813, when the Cork Committee of Merchants commissioned architect Sir Thomas Deane to design and build The Commercial Rooms. In 1816 the merchants requested Deane to extend the original building along Pembroke Street to serve as a hotel and coach-yard. The Imperial Hotel Cork, originally the place where merchants met to discuss business, remains the most popular business and social centre in the city today. This Cork City Hotel has played host to a number of renowned figures including Fr Mathew the temperance priest, writers such as Sir Walter Scott, William Makepeace Thackeray, Charles Dickens and the composer Liszt. Michael Collins, who negotiated the Free State Treaty in 1921 and is an important figure in Irish history, spent his last night in room 115 at the Imperial Hotel.

This amazing 4 star hotel Cork has a colourful history and makes The Imperial Hotel Cork a wonderful choice of accommodation when visiting the city!

The Irish Times "Michael Collins slept in the Imperial Hotel the night before he died. Maria Edgeworth stayed there with Sir Walter Scott - though not, of course, in the same room. Liszt stayed, Charles Dickens came to report on an eminent gathering, William Makepeace Thackeray took tea there with temperance priest Fr Matthew and, years later, George Best came to stay, got into a fight and left. Maureen O'Hara dines there, the actor Brian Dennehy is a regular and so, before Saipan, was Mick McCarthy. He's still welcome, the Imperial Hotel assures. And then there are the everyday staff and guests, the Corkonians who lunch, take coffee or meet for health spa treats; all of them fans of the intimacy of the Imperial Hotel's grandeur, its way of being salubrious without pretension, its welcoming comforts."